Blogging to grow your business: 3 lessons ‘the experts’ won’t tell you

By Jeff Molander

blogging to grow your business

Time to read: 2 minutes. There is a lot of information online about blogging to grow your business. Yet people are failing left and right. They’re not even getting off the ground. Why? Because the experts are wrong. Giving customers your best advice and writing engaging stories will NOT convince them to buy. We’ve been told this is “what works.” But blogging to grow your business takes more. Here are 3 lessons I learned the hard way. Here’s what WILL get you into the sky—what to do and where to start. 

Advice you give-away doesn’t matter

How you give away advice matters more (to growing your business) than the advice itself.  So… how can you move beyond being seen as an engaging expert—toward blogging to grow your business?

Answer: Focus more on the structure of your advice, not on the quality or quantity of advice itself.

Here’s what I mean. Blogging to help customers solve a problem or achieve a goal is a great starting point. You should always give-away your very best advice when blogging to grow your business. It IS part of what works. But it’s not a complete strategy. It is a starting point.

The main point here is this: How you give away advice matters more than the advice itself. 

If you want to be seen as an expert AND generate business leads with your blog focus on how you structure words within a blog post. For example, when you blog are you leading customers down a path—where they choose the final destination? Are you guiding in ways that help them make better decisions or understand “best fit” for their needs?

For example, are you

  • structuring words to create “buying confidence” in potential customers?
  • using trigger words to provoke readers to become a lead?

Are you designing what you write to create an urge and trigger behavior?

Or are you like most bloggers—over-focusing on what advice you’re giving away, how much … and why you give away information at all?

The best starting point when blogging to grow your business is your customers’ problems or goals—answering questions in ways that empower and guide them toward what you’re selling. However, helping, teaching or guiding them and structuring what you write will create fare more leads, more often.

Curiosity is the goal, not engagement

People look at me like I’m from the moon when I say, “the goal of social media is not to engage with customers.” But when I finish the sentence folks often get excited.

The goal of your blog is to sell.

First, we get attention.

Then we get engaged with.

The trick is to get engaged with and immediately create meaning—some kind of “ah-ha!” or meaningful resolution for the reader.

Because once you’ve created meaning for a reader you’ve opened the door. You become immediately qualified to invite customers on a journey to where they want to go—somewhere better, smarter, faster.

Now THAT is engagement you can DO something with, right?

The goal is to create intense curiosity in what you have to contribute to the reader—in totality, not just in that one blog post. If you structure words correctly the result is an intense curiosity in you and HUNGER for more of what you might know, see, be able to shed light on or DO for the reader.

How cool is that? This is where a clear, compelling call to action comes into play. This is where you convert your reader into a business lead using a lead generation offer that meets the “hunger for more” head-on!

SEO has never mattered less

The truth about search engine optimization (SEO) is becoming evident: We can only send signals to Google about the blogs we write. Many of those signals are out of our control. At best, they’re indirectly controllable. It’s true.

Anyone who tells you otherwise is charlatan.

Yes, you need to be found on Google. But what good is being found on Google if you can’t earn a business lead to grow your customer base?

What good is getting crushed with inbound visitor traffic to your blog if what you write fails to create intense, irresistible curiosity in you?

See what I mean? You can have all the page 1 placements on Google for all your most popular keyword terms. You can have all the traffic to your site too. Without the means to get readers to sign-up and become a lead it’s all wasted time, energy and money.

When blogging to grow your business, what you write should “move-the-needle” for prospects. But it ALSO must provoke readers to take action.

Good news: There is a better way

Creating blog articles that get found, engaged with and acted on by customers takes a system. Here is the essence of that system.

  1. determine what topic(s) matter enough to customers to …
  2. get their attention and hold it long enough to …
  3. prove you can increase their success rate in a way that …
  4. creates HUNGER for more from YOU (what you sell!)

So where to start on DOING that—not just understanding it?

Start with the Make My Blog Sell for Me lead generation training course. Because honestly, your success does not rely on what I can show you. It relies on what you DO … what you and I can do with focused time together.

If the course is not for you quite yet, no problem. My free training course will be a great option. It even includes 2 worksheets to get you taking ACTION.

To your success!

Photo credit: Beadmobile.

 

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About the Author

Jeff Molander is the authority on starting sales conversations online. He teaches a proven, effective and repeatable communications process to spark buyers curiosity about what you're selling. He's a sought-after sales prospecting trainer to individual reps, teams of sellers and small businesses owners across the globe. He's an accomplished entrepreneur, having co-founded the Google Affiliate Network and what is today the Performics division of Publicis Groupe. Jeff also serves as adjunct digital marketing faculty at Loyola University’s school of business. His book, Off The Hook Marketing: How to Make Social Media Sell for You, is first to offer businesses a clear, practical way to create leads and sales with technology platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and blogs.